Resources

Canadian Atlas of Child and Youth Injury Prevention Interactive Website

The Canadian Atlas of Child and Youth Injury Prevention Interactive Website brings child and youth injury data together on one platform, including injury outcomes, risk factors and policies concerning national and provincial level injury mortality, hospitalization, drowning, and transport data. The Atlas provides injury information and data through ten broad indicator categories and also highlights the research of the CIHR Team in Child & Youth Injury Prevention.

The goal of the Atlas is to assist practitioners, policy-makers and researchers in making informed decisions that will improve child and youth injury prevention measures in Canada.

Boating Safety Resources for the NWT

This week the NWTRPA and NWTRPA Aquatics Committee announced the territory-wide launch of a collection of boating safety resources to battle the high rates of drowning in the NWT. The resources include everything from posters (in English, Gwich’in, and Inuvialuktun), to a boat safety app, to a northern specific boating pre-departure checklist.

Active and Safe After School Initiative - Safety Check / Online downloadable resources

The Active and Safe After School Initiative includes various resources:

  1. After School Safety Check - resources and tools that help reduce the prevalence of physical injuries that occur during after school programs
  2. Free Online Resources - four resources related to safety education and injury prevention - Activity Plans, Activity Checklists, Parent Checklists, and 16 Checklists.

Parachute Safe Kids Week 2016 Resources

This site includes numerous resources including a Community Toolkit (for purchase) containing all the resources and tools needed to roll out a successful Parachute Safe Kids Week in your community. Use the toolkit to help organize activities and events around child safety At Home, At Play and On the Road.

Other resources include posters, media templates, banners, safety information such as for concussions, cycling, water safety, playground safety and more, research and evidence summary reports, and much more.

Safe for Elders, Safe for All

site from the Nlaka’pamux Nation Tribal Council with exercise videos, falls prevention techniques, games, events and additional resources. 

The Play Spaces Project Reports

The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) "Active and Safe: Injury Prevention Initiative Tier 2 (C) Playgrounds and Neighbourhood Play Spaces" project funded under the PHAC "Active and Safe" initiative addressed the safety of outdoor play spaces (including playgrounds, green spaces, urban areas such as parking lots and vacant lots, and the street) available to vulnerable children and youth in Canada, aged six to 12.

The Canadian Standards Association and Canadian Playground Safety Institute currently address playground safety, however the safety of all outdoor play spaces being used by children, specifically among vulnerable populations in Canada, was a recognized gap.

Play Spaces For Vulnerable Children and Youth: A Synthesis Of Studies presents a synthesis of the following three studies and includes an overview of overlapping findings on children’s play space preferences as well as a description of safety issues and concerns regarding children’s play spaces.

The Play Spaces Project: Key Informants’ Perspective presents the methodology and results of a play spaces key informant survey, designed to determine what is known about safety issues associated with play spaces for this population.  

The Play Spaces Project: Literature Review presents the methodology and results of a literature review, designed to determine what is known about play spaces for this population.

The Play Spaces Project: Exploring Children’s Lived Experiences of Play Spaces through Participatory Photo-Mapping describes a pilot research project that employed Participatory Photo Mapping in order to gain a better understanding of children's experiences of play spaces in two low SES neighborhoods. It includes an overview of the study's main objectives, research methods and key outcomes. This is followed by an outline of potential implications of the study and suggestions and strategies for future work on children, risk, injury, and play spaces.

 

Evaluation of the Active and Safe Injury Prevention Initiative 2011-2012 to 2012-2013

The purpose of the evaluation was to assess the relevance and performance of the Active and Safe Injury Prevention Initiative. The timeframe of this evaluation was from April 1, 2011 (the date the initiative started) until March 31, 2013 (the date of its completion).

Program Description: The Initiative was a two-year $5 million initiative aimed at decreasing the incidence of sport and recreation-related injuries in children and youth (0-19 years) through improving community awareness and enhancing collaboration among injury prevention stakeholders. Initiative funding was distributed through contribution agreements to injury prevention and sports and recreation NGOs to deliver injury prevention projects across Canada. A total of 18 injury prevention projects were funded through three sequential tiers dealing with concussions, fractures and drownings.

Developing a Concussion Policy: Information for Recreation and Sport Leaders and Organizations

Developing a Concussion Policy: Information for Recreation and Sport Leaders & Organizations was produced in collaboration with a number of Canadian organizations from health, education, recreation and sport and is based on the Center for Disease and Injury Control (CDC)'s Get a Heads Up on Concussion in Sports: Policies Information for Parents, Coaches, and School & Sports Professionals. PSI is grateful to the CDC for permission to recreate the document for a Canadian audience.

This document is intended to promote discussion and action about concussion prevention and management strategies within sport and recreation organizations in Canada. Injuries, like concussion, are predictable and preventable. This information should not serve as a proxy for legal or healthcare advice.

This free resource is available for organizations to download and share as they embark on the process of developing appropriate concussion policies.

Course Manual to Obtain the Pleasure Craft Operator Card

This handbook is a reference guide for the Boating Safety Course in order to obtain the Pleasure Craft Operator Card as set out by Transport Canada. The text can be referred to during your course or can prepare you for the test. It can even be used as a personal reference later on board your boat. It has been drawn up in accordance with Transport Canada’s safe boating guide. If you have any comments regarding the contents of this handbook or the course, do not hesitate to contact the National Boating Safety School.

Water Smart Tips - includes boating, ice, fishing

Tips provided through the Lifesaving Society's Water Smart Program, which looks at efforts to reduce the incidence of drownings and water related deaths everywhere in Canada and specifically in Alberta and the Northwest Territories' water rich environments. Includes: Boat and Fishing Safety Tips; Ice Safety Tips; Water Safety Tips.

Boating safety tips in 33 languages

In an effort to reach out to Canadians whose first language is not English, the Lifesaving Society and Ontario Power Generation (OPG) teamed up to produce a tip sheet of ten boating safety tips available in 33 languages. Materials translated into the First Nations languages are available to the First Nations community and groups who promote boating safety including the Canadian Rangers.

Making Head Way Concussion eLearning Series

By taking these NCCP Professional Development modules, you will not only become concussion smart, but your completion of one of these module will also be recorded on your coaching transcript as professional development.

Designed to help you gain the knowledge and skills required to ensure the safety of your athletes, these modules will cover: what to do to prevent concussions, how to recognize the signs and symptoms of a concussion, what to do when you suspect an athlete has a concussion, and how to ensure athletes return to play safely.

ThinkFirst Smart Hockey Video / Smart Hockey Concussion Kit

ThinkFirst's hockey video has info on concussion, protecting your brain and spinal cord, as well as on return-to-play after you have recovered from concussion symptoms. It is intended for young hockey players and their families, and also for their coaches, referees, trainers, league officials and for the medical personnel who provide treatment for active and injured players.

This video has been endorsed by the NHL, NHLPA, the IIHF and Hockey Canada.

The Concussion Kit and related resources accompany the video.

Homelessness in Parks: A summary of results from an NRPA membership survey

This US report notes that, in many communities, urban park and recreation agencies are finding themselves on the front lines of the issue of homelessness because of the often heavy presence of homeless individuals on public parkland and in agency run facilities.

The National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) research team developed a 25-question survey to gain an understanding of the views and actions of park and recreation departments and other local government agencies toward the homeless population across the country. Sixty-five park and recreation agencies responded to the survey, the key findings from which are the basis of this report and were presented at the January 2017 NRPA Innovation Lab in Los Angeles.

Key survey highlights include:

  • Cities’ efforts to mitigate homelessness involve a citywide, cross-agency, cross-sector strategy, incorporating governmental agencies, non-profits, and faith-based and community organizations.
  • Nonprofit organizations, departments of health and human services, and the police are cities’ most frequently leaders in combating homelessness.
  • Most urban park and recreation agencies do not permit people to encamp on public land overnight, with more than half of agencies permitted to remove people with little or no notice.
  • Three in four park and recreation agencies are using, or are considering the inclusion of, design and infrastructure elements that discourage people from staying overnight in parks.
  • A majority of urban park and recreation agencies rely on their cities’ police departments to enforce anti-loitering rules on public park property.
  • Over half of park and recreation agencies offer services to their homeless population, including access to restrooms and showers, shelter during periods of inclement weather and access to computers and telephones.

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